The San Lorenzo Valley

We can preserve
Together
Riparian Corridor
Heal the
With a native habitat in your backyard
Create a Sanctuary

Protecting Our Watershed

The San Lorenzo Valley watershed originates in the Santa Cruz Mountains in Castle Rock State Park and is a major source of water for the city of Santa Cruz as well as important coho salmon and steelhead trout habitat. Our efforts directly support this native fishery and the health of the watershed throughout the SLV.

Restoring Native Habitat

English ivy, vinca, and Himalayan blackberry are invasive, non-native plants. The San Lorenzo Valley Restoration Project removes invasive growth, expands native habitat corridors on public lands, and teaches skills for homeowners so that native plants and wildlife thrive.

Involving the Community

Everyone is invited to become involved in restoring riparian habitat, from private backyards to public parks. The San Lorenzo Valley Restoration Project provides online tools that identify and define the steps needed to take an active role in improving the health of our watershed.

27,944

Hours Worked with AmeriCorps Teams

20,000+

Blackberry Crowns Removed

25

Acres Public Lands Restoration Work

Remove Invasives, Reveal Natives
and Restore the Natural Habitat

Join the Community Effort!

The Daily Dirt

Monarch

What butterflies really want (and need)

Butterflies are beautiful, vital pollinators in our gardens and forests We in the SLV are fortunate to live near overwintering sites for Monarchs in Santa Cruz and Monterey. We have all heard that we can help declining populations by planting milkweed, but planting milkweed close to overwintering populations is disruptive to their migration. San Lorenzo…

Scouts and their bee boxes

Abuzz About Bee Boxes

San Lorenzo Valley Native Habitat Restoration Program Busy with Bees The Valley Women’s Club’s Native Habitat Restoration Program engaged AmeriCorps NCCC Team Fire 5 to remove embedded plastic sheeting and invasive plant growth from under the San Lorenzo Valley Water District Kirby Street substation solar panels that border the Felton Discovery Park. The area around…

Our Native Habitat in Action

Set in the redwood forest of the Santa Cruz Mountains, this video is about the life cycle of the California Hazel throughout the year. It includes shots of its own special flowers and catkins as well as various other forest wild flowers. Steller’s Jays and Grey Squirrels are also seen eating the nutritious nuts. Video: Fred & Roberta McPherson.

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